Our Internet Service Provider logs all visits to this website for providing statistical reporting. From this log, no attempt will be made to either identify users, or record their browsing activities, unless a warrant is issued by a law enforcement agency.
Information captured in the log is the date and time of the visit, server address of the user, pages browsed and documents downloaded, previous sites visited and types of browser used.

This site uses Session Cookies. When you first visit the site, a Cookie is downloaded to your computer, and tracks your access of the site. The Cookie is only used to identify multiple page requests as belonging to the same visit (or session). The ability to track a session is required when a user logs into a restricted or members only area of the site via a user name and password.

We will only record your e-mail address if you send us a message. It will only be used for the purpose for which you have provided it and will not be added to a mailing list. We will not use your e-mail address for any other purpose, and will not disclose it, without your consent. The Privacy Act 1988 (Privacy Act) provides protection to individuals against the mishandling of personal information and applies to organisations which include individuals, partnerships, corporations and unincorporated associations. It does not apply to individuals in a non-business capacity. Amendments were passed to the Privacy Act in November 2012 with the new privacy regime taking effect from 12 March 2014. This new regime, including the adoption of a single set of 13 Australian Privacy Principles (APPs), apply to Government agencies and private sector organisations (‘APP entities’).

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) has adopted an enforcement approach to the reforms. The OAIC compliance focus in the months following 12 March 2014 is currently on working with entities to ensure that they understand the new requirements and have the systems in place to meet them. In resolving matters brought to the attention of the OAIC it will take into account the steps taken by entities to genuinely prepare for the changes and to comply with the new legal requirements.
In the case of individual complaints, the OAIC would expect to see the individual try to resolve a matter with the organisation or agency first. If the respondent is a member of a recognised External Dispute Resolution scheme, the OAIC would expect the individual to have first accessed that scheme. If a matter is accepted by OAIC, the OAIC will always attempt to resolve issues through conciliation. In relation to Commissioner initiated investigations the OAIC will work with respondent organisations and agencies to resolve the matter.
Where conciliation or working with entities is not effective, the OAIC may use other tools, including determinations, enforceable undertakings or in the case of serious or repeated breaches, initiating court proceedings for civil penalties. This is consistent with OAIC current practices and the approach of the OAIC for some time.